* Login   * Register Feedback Feedback    * FAQ    * Medals   * Search
It is currently Fri Jul 21, 2017 3:37 pm

All times are UTC + 1 hour




Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 14 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Millipede care sheet
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:45 pm 
Offline
Admin
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 45359
Location: south east london uk
Millipede care sheet

As translated very roughly by a non-Swedish speaking Englishman using an online dictionary and a lot of guesswork where the resulting sentences did not make a great deal of sense.
And it took him an hour aint he sweet?
And thank you to Fredrik for it :wink:


[edited version further down this page]


Last edited by Shaz on Fri May 26, 2006 2:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 10:51 pm 
Offline
Co-Admin
Co-Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2006 11:23 pm
Posts: 2183
Location: Woodley, Berks
Fredrik, please feel free to correct me, a lot of that may be wrong.

_________________

LivefoodsForGood.co.uk << Click to Visit The Site
High quality livefood packaged to order, sent fresh from the breeder and only 1.39 a tub.
30% of profits supporting reptile rescue and conservation charities. Same day despatch.




Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:12 pm 
Well done Pace, I'm impressed :P
And yes Shaz, he's sweet :P

I can help you with some of the words for starters:

Lönn - Maple, Acer platanoides
Torv - Peat
Blomjord - Potting soil (is that correct, the soil for flowers)
Groblad - Common plantain, Plantago major
Palsternacka - Parsnip, Pastinaca sativa
Romansallad - Romaine or Cos lettuce Lactuca sativa longifolia
Kaktusfikon - Prickly pear fruit, Opuntia sp.
Avokado - Avocado Persea americana
Sepiaskal - Cuttlefish bone


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 31, 2006 11:37 pm 
I'm afraid I'm starting to get too tired to read and find errors, so I'll give it another try tomorrow when I have had some sleep.
I think you have made a tremendous work, Pace, translating the text, given the fact that you have never spoken Swedish.
Well done and thanks for helping me translate.

Good night or as we say in Sweden, God natt ;)

Best wishes
Fredrik


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 04, 2006 5:59 pm 
Offline
Co-Admin
Co-Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2006 11:23 pm
Posts: 2183
Location: Woodley, Berks
Please scroll down for final version of the Millipede care sheet.

_________________

LivefoodsForGood.co.uk << Click to Visit The Site
High quality livefood packaged to order, sent fresh from the breeder and only 1.39 a tub.
30% of profits supporting reptile rescue and conservation charities. Same day despatch.




Last edited by Pace on Thu Apr 13, 2006 1:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 1:21 pm 
Offline
Co-Admin
Co-Admin
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2006 11:23 pm
Posts: 2183
Location: Woodley, Berks
Millipede Care sheet


Terrarium


The size you need will depend mostly on which species you have. As a rule, multiply the body length by 3, but the larger you can provide, the better.

Whether or not you keep them in a planted terrarium of a plastic container makes little difference, the important thing is to ensure that the millipede has what it needs - heat, food and water.

They do not require a lot of light, in particular not UV. Most species are night active and/or live in leaflitter or in old, decomposing logs.

Substrate

The best substrate is a mixture of dead leaves and rotting wood
This may include leaves and wood from oak, beech and maple, but also wood and leaves from other deciduous trees.
Important to note is that you do not use fresh leaves, unless the leaves have been on the ground for a few months, and the white wood must be so soft as to crumble in your hands.

This wood must come from the rotting logs and stumps of a deciduous species of tree (not coniferous species, such as pine), and be rotten to the point it is soft and crumbly (the result of fungal action and native invertebrates breaking down the cellulose in the wood, often over several years). The wood should be soft enough to crumble in your fingeres, but still an off-white colour, as it should not be so rotten that it is brown/grey.

Break down the leaves and wood, and distribute them evenly. Soak the substrate in a container full of water overnight, in order to kill off parasites and other insects, and soften the substrate.
Substrate should be at least 10cm thick and should ALWAYS be damp, but not wet.
Most species will feed on this substrate.

Some other substrates that are often used are peat and potting soil (compost).

Environment



Many of those species that exist in the hobby come from Madagascar, the Congo, Malaysia, Thailand and other tropical countries, with permanent rains and a relatively high and steady temperature. However, although a tropical country, Madagascar has considerable variations in temperatures and humidity, depending on seasons and altitude.

Certain of the smaller more exotic species that exists on Madagascar, eg Fire Millipede (Aphistogoniulus sp.) and Pill Millipedes (Sphaerotheriida sp.), will not tolerate temperatures over 20ºC. At these temperature, the millipedes will begin to refuse food and will eventually die.

The larger species, such as African Giant Millipede prefer a temperature over 20ºC.

Food

Millipedes are primarily vegetarians. They live on decomposing plant parts, fungi and algae, but will occasionally eat carcasses.
Since millipede shells consist in part of calcium, this must be provided as a supplement. Often the diet provides sufficient calcium, however supplementary calcium may be given in the form of a cuttlefish bone, which should be included as a precaution..

Millipedes need a varied diet off both fruit and veg in order to thrive. Below, some examples follow of fruit and vegetables that most of the common species eat:

Plants and vegetables
Dandelion blades/flowers (rich in calcium)
Common Plantain (Plantago major, rich in calcium)
Thistle leaves/flowers
Carrot
Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)
Peas
Romain Lettuce (Lactuca sativa longifolia)
Pumps
Courgette
Cucumber (does not contain a lot of nutrients, but is a good source of water)
Fruit
Prickly pear fruit (Opuntia sp.)(rich in calcium)
Papaya (rich in calcium)
Apple
Pears
Mango
Avocado Persea americana
Other
Fish food (flakes)
new-born mouse young (ie pinkies)

Millipede Defences

When a millipede feels threatened, it exudes a poisonous secretion which
varies in its effects and intensity between species.
Most of the most common species that occur in the hobby are, however, relatively harmless, but there are exceptions.
Avoid getting secretion in the eyes and in the mouth, where they can do most damage.
These secretions may cause an allergic reaction, and repeat exposure has been linked to cancer.
In order to avoid being squirted, allow a millipede to climb onto your hand. do not pick it up, as it will feel threatened.

Millipede Facts

-The biggest species of millipede can grow to more than 30cm (Archispirostreptus sp.), whereas the smallest grows to only only a few millimeters.
-A millipede can live more than 10 years, but 1-7 is more usual
-There is no species of millipede with a thousand feet. The closest is Illacme plenipes with 375 pairs (750 feet)
-Diopsiulus regressus, can jump 2-3 cm when threatened

Fredrik Häljesgård

_________________

LivefoodsForGood.co.uk << Click to Visit The Site
High quality livefood packaged to order, sent fresh from the breeder and only 1.39 a tub.
30% of profits supporting reptile rescue and conservation charities. Same day despatch.




Last edited by Pace on Sat Apr 22, 2006 11:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:13 pm 
Superb!

Thank you so much for helping me translating the text, pace.

Best wishes
Fredrik


Top
  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 13, 2006 6:55 pm 
Yep, much appreciated by at least one new soon to be Millie owner.

~Terry~


Top
  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 17, 2006 9:18 pm 
Offline
Part of the furniture
Part of the furniture

Joined: Tue Jul 11, 2006 9:27 pm
Posts: 1020
Location: West Midlands, England
Millipede Care sheet


Terrarium:

The size you need will depend mostly on which species you have. As a rule, multiply the body length by 3, but the larger you can provide, the better.

Whether or not you keep them in a planted terrarium of a plastic container makes little difference, the important thing is to ensure that the millipede has what it needs - heat, food and water.

They do not require a lot of light, in particular not UV. Most species are night active and/or live in leaflitter or in old, decomposing logs.

Substrate:
The best substrate is a mixture of dead leaves and rotting wood
This may include leaves and wood from oak, beech and maple, but also wood and leaves from other deciduous trees.
Important to note is that you do not use fresh leaves, unless the leaves have been on the ground for a few months, and the white wood must be so soft as to crumble in your hands.

This wood must come from the rotting logs and stumps of a deciduous species of tree (not coniferous species, such as pine), and be rotten to the point it is soft and crumbly (the result of fungal action and native invertebrates breaking down the cellulose in the wood, often over several years). The wood should be soft enough to crumble in your fingeres, but still an off-white colour, as it should not be so rotten that it is brown/grey.

Break down the leaves and wood, and distribute them evenly. Soak the substrate in a container full of water overnight, in order to kill off parasites and other insects, and soften the substrate.
Substrate should be at least 10cm thick and should ALWAYS be damp, but not wet.
Most species will feed on this substrate.

Some other substrates that are often used are peat and potting soil (compost).

Environment:

Many of those species that exist in the hobby come from Madagascar, the Congo, Malaysia, Thailand and other tropical countries, with permanent rains and a relatively high and steady temperature. However, although a tropical country, Madagascar has considerable variations in temperatures and humidity, depending on seasons and altitude.

Certain of the smaller more exotic species that exists on Madagascar, eg Fire Millipede (Aphistogoniulus sp.) and Pill Millipedes (Sphaerotheriida sp.), will not tolerate temperatures over 20ºC. At these temperature, the millipedes will begin to refuse food and will eventually die.

The larger species, such as African Giant Millipede prefer a temperature over 20ºC.

Food:
Millipedes are primarily vegetarians. They live on decomposing plant parts, fungi and algae, but will occasionally eat carcasses.
Since millipede shells consist in part of calcium, this must be provided as a supplement. Often the diet provides sufficient calcium, however supplementary calcium may be given in the form of a cuttlefish bone, which should be included as a precaution..

Millipedes need a varied diet off both fruit and veg in order to thrive. Below, some examples follow of fruit and vegetables that most of the common species eat:

Plants and vegetables
Dandelion blades/flowers (rich in calcium)
Common Plantain (Plantago major, rich in calcium)
Thistle leaves/flowers
Carrot
Parsnip (Pastinaca sativa)
Peas
Romain Lettuce (Lactuca sativa longifolia)
Pumps
Courgette
Cucumber (does not contain a lot of nutrients, but is a good source of water)
Fruit
Prickly pear fruit (Opuntia sp.)(rich in calcium)
Papaya (rich in calcium)
Apple
Pears
Mango
Avocado Persea americana
Other
Fish food (flakes)
new-born mouse young (ie pinkies)

Millipede Defences:

When a millipede feels threatened, it exudes a poisonous secretion which
varies in its effects and intensity between species.
Most of the most common species that occur in the hobby are, however, relatively harmless, but there are exceptions.
Avoid getting secretion in the eyes and in the mouth, where they can do most damage.
These secretions may cause an allergic reaction, and repeat exposure has been linked to cancer.
In order to avoid being squirted, allow a millipede to climb onto your hand. do not pick it up, as it will feel threatened.

Millipede Facts:
-The biggest species of millipede can grow to more than 30cm (Archispirostreptus sp.), whereas the smallest grows to only only a few millimeters.
-A millipede can live more than 10 years, but 1-7 is more usual
-There is no species of millipede with a thousand feet. The closest is Illacme plenipes with 375 pairs (750 feet)
-Diopsiulus regressus, can jump 2-3 cm when threatened

Caresheet courtesy of Fredrik Häljesgård

_________________
*~* Matron Smith *~*


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2006 12:46 am 
Offline
Admin
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 45359
Location: south east london uk
Tarantulabarn.com
Steve Paine.Dip Pi Am Inst Ta (ATS,IHS,FBH,BTS,ESRAS)
Phone : 01273 701708 or 07801 128701
www.tarantulabarn.com email: Steve@tarantulabarn.com
With thanks to Steve for letting us use these

Millipedes – A general care guide.


This sheet is to provide you with some information on the preferences of food and habitats for most of the millipede types available in the pet trade today. It should be noted the information presented is merely to give you a starting point for your millipedes' likes and dislikes, and what to expect from it.

Food:

Cucumber slices and oak leaves are an excellent staple source of food for all types of millipedes. Some will take apple and other vegetation, so millipedes are very easy to feed. Oak leaves also help to provide your millipede with enough nutrients to promote successful molting and a firm exoskeleton. If at all possible, food should be dusted with a calcium powder, often available from good pet stores. This again will help with molting and sustaining good exoseletons.

Burrowing habits:

Most millipedes will burrow into the peat to conceal themselves during the day. However, there are several varieties which will choose to remain on top of the peat but will merely seek shelter under leaves or other cage decorations. Its advisable to include some form of shelter, either in the form of bark or leaves so your millipede can take cover when it wants. A lack of hiding places can cause stress.

Substrate:

The best substrate to use is common garden peat. Try to avoid composts or other mixes. You can further enhance this by adding a layer of sphagnum moss (found in your gardening center). Try to avoid normal soil as this sometimes contains abrasive particles that can harm and scratch your millipedes' exoskeleton. It should also be noted that in addition to being a food source, dried oak leaves are also a nice ground cover for the millipedes to hide under.

Heat and humidity.

Almost all varieties will enjoy heat and humidity. To achieve this keep them in a warm room or supplement the heat using a controlled heat mat under one third of the enclosure. Humidity can be maintained by way of daily misting and even a water bowl for the larger species.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 11:42 pm 
Offline
Admin
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 45359
Location: south east london uk
Tarantulabarn.com
Steve Paine. (ATS,HIS,FBH,BTS,ESRAS)
Phone : 01273 701708 or 07801 128701
www.tarantulabarn.com email: Steve@tarantulabarn.com
Thank you Steve for allowing us to use these

The Tanzanian Red Leg Millipede
Ephibolus pulchripes


A Tanzanian Red Leg Millipede makes a very beautiful millipede pet. Sporting black body color with bright red legs, this millipede is one of the prettier species. The difference between sexes in this species is very clear. Tanzanian Red Leg Millipede males are have a shiny body, while the females are dull in body coloration. You can see the difference in the photo to the left. Tanzanian Red Leg Millipedes do breed in captivity, so specimens should be purchased from a breeder, as some of the millipedes taken from the wild will refuse to eat in captivity. Millipedes born in captivity tend to be less picky when food is concerned. The Tanzanian Red Leg Millipede is a relatively large millipede, and is docile, like most millipedes are. Therefore, a captive-bred Tanzanian Red Leg Millipede is a great choice for an appealing millipede pet.

Range: Tanzania.
Type: Terrestrial, but will burrow to some extent.
Diet: Babies and adults eat apples, cucumbers, oak leaves and other plant material. Millipedes should have a supply of calcium added to their diet, like calcium powder, which can be purchased from most pet stores.
Full Grown Size: 4 to 6 inches.
Growth: Slow speed.
Temperature: 75 to 80° F.
Humidity: Around 75%.
Temperament: Docile and calm.
Housing: Babies can live in a roomy clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank, depending on the number of millipedes. Millipedes can live communally. The tank should be twice as long, and at least as wide as the individual, or the largest millipede in the tank. Floor space is more important than height.
Substrate: 2 to 3 inches of peat moss, or potting soil.
Decor: No decorations are really needed. Moss can be added for floor cover.
Other Names: Tanzanian Red Legged Millipede, Red Leg Millipede, and Red Legged Millipede.
_________________


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Aug 28, 2006 11:45 pm 
Offline
Admin
Admin
User avatar

Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:34 pm
Posts: 45359
Location: south east london uk
Tarantulabarn.com
Steve Paine. (ATS,HIS,FBH,BTS,ESRAS)
Phone : 01273 701708 or 07801 128701
www.tarantulabarn.com email: Steve@tarantulabarn.com

Thanks Steve for letting us use these

Giant Millipedes - How to care for Giant Millipedes



Range Tropical and sub-tropical western Africa.
Type Terrestrial, but will burrow to some extent.
Diet Babies and adults eat bananas, tomatoes, melons, romaine lettuce, apples, cucumbers, and other fruits and vegetables. Millipedes should have a supply of calcium added to their diet, like calcium powder, which can be purchased from most pet stores.
Full Grown Size 7.5 to 11 inches.
Growth Slow speed.
Temperature 75 to 85° F.
Humidity 75 to 80%.
Temperament Docile and calm.
Housing Babies can live in a roomy clear plastic container with air holes. Adults can live in a 5 to 10-gallon tank, depending on the size of the millipede. Millipedes can live communally. The tank should be twice as long, and at least as wide as the individual, or the largest millipede in the tank. Floor space is more important than height.
Substrate 3 to 4 inches of peat moss and potting soil, kept moist.
Decor No decorations are really needed.
Other Names Giant Millipede, African Black Millipede, and Tanzanian Giant Black Millipede.

General Adult size is about 10 inches long. In general, giant millipedes have an expected lifespan of about 7-10 years. They have two main modes of defence if they feel threatened: they curl into a tight spiral, and they secrete an irritating liquid from pores on their body. This liquid can be harmful if it gets in your eyes or mouth so you must wash your hands after handling a millipede. Some people are more sensitive to the liquid than others, and some species are more "toxic" than others. They can be handled, and are quite docile and slow moving. They get along fine with others so you can keep more than one per tank. They do breed quite readily so if you have males and females together you may find yourself with babies. Male millipedes have modified legs on the 7th body segment called gonopods. These legs look different than the other legs (they have grasping claws) and are often carried tucked up under the body. Millipedes do not actually have a thousand legs - they usually have between 100-400 (2 sets of legs per body segment). Each time they molt, they add more segments and therefore more legs.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Millipede care sheet
PostPosted: Tue Mar 13, 2012 7:40 pm 
Offline
Just joined
Just joined

Joined: Wed Feb 29, 2012 6:16 pm
Posts: 9
what temperatures do vietnamise rainbowmillipedes like


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: Millipede care sheet
PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 3:20 pm 
Offline
Really getting into this place
Really getting into this place

Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2011 6:37 pm
Posts: 179
Location: New Mexico, USA
Mine do fine at "room temp". They may grow a little faster at temps up to 27C, but I have not tried to go that high.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic This topic is locked, you cannot edit posts or make further replies.  [ 14 posts ] 

All times are UTC + 1 hour


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
[ Time : 0.153s | 30 Queries | GZIP : On ]